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About Salcombe

Situated in an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, Salcombe has been a holiday hot-spot for generations, proving a paradise for all the ages. Whether you’re looking to ride wild waters, hike through enchanting landscapes or simply lounge on golden sands, Salcombe will not disappoint.

Lining the beach is a vibrant harbour-side town brimming with treats from independent shops, restaurants and bars. This is where tourists and locals come together to create the cheerful atmosphere that Salcombe is famous for: after all, if your only concern is which food to try next or which beach to explore, you’ve got a reason to be cheerful. If you’re planning a trip to the area, take a look at our selection of things to do.

Discover your perfect seaside escape by browsing our collection of Salcombe holiday cottages, and find your idyllic home base to unwind and explore this coastal gem.

Travel

How to get to Salcombe You can get to Salcombe by plane, train and automobile. For 70 years, from 1893 to 1963, there was a train that went from Totnes to Kingsbridge but the growth in the popularity of the motorcar meant it was eventually shut down. Amazingly, there was even a plan to open…

Shops

List of all the Salcombe Shops While Salcombe is well-known for its outstanding natural beauty, a simple stroll through the famous Fore Street will show you the contribution that Salcombe’s community has had in making the town what it is today. Scattered with a selection of independent outlets offering the finest in fashion, food, homeware…

Maps

Salcombe Maps Salcombe is located in the South Hams which is the most southerly part of south Devon. It starts in the lower quarter of Dartmoor National Park and spreads to the west towards Plymouth, around the coast, and to the east encapsulating Dartmouth and Totnes. Did you know? The name South Hams comes from…

Facts

Salcombe Facts 1. There used to be a train line from Totnes to Kingsbridge and there were even plans to build an extension to Salcombe! The terminal was to be at Snapes Point with a ferry taking passengers across the estuary to the town. 2. Today the population in Salcombe is 1800 in winter and 19,000…

Estuary

Salcombe Estuary Strictly speaking, Salcombe estuary isn’t technically an estuary but a Ria; a tidal inlet with no major fresh water source flowing through it. It was formed as river-cut valleys were flooded by post-glacial rising sea levels. Such flooded river valleys are known as ‘rias’, or in this instance, a ‘dendritic ria’ as each creek is…

Beaches

Salcombe Beaches Beaches are one of the reasons our guests return to Salcombe year after year. From the buzzing Smalls Cove packed with sailing dinghy’s, picnics and volleyball to the family-friendly beach at Mill Bay. There are the lesser known beaches such as Eleandor Cove and Splats Cove (brilliantly sheltered if the wind picks up)…